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Forest Products Laboratory
One Gifford Pinchot Drive
Madison, WI 53726-2398
Phone: (608) 231-9200
Fax: (608) 231-9592
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Cellulose Nano-enabled Products: Applications and Volume Estimates

Forest Service scientists Alan Rudie (left) and Richard Reiner stand with cellulose nanocrystals manufactured at the Forest Products Laboratory. Steve Schmieding, USDA Forest Service
Forest Service scientists Alan Rudie (left) and Richard Reiner stand with cellulose nanocrystals manufactured at the Forest Products Laboratory. Steve Schmieding, USDA Forest Service
Snapshot: Cellulose nanomaterials are the next big (albeit, small) thing in wood. They can be combined in numerous ways to change the way many products work. This research identified potential end product markets and provided estimates of the potential demand for wood-based cellulose nanomaterial.
Summary:

Cellulose nanomaterials have enormous potential to enable sustainable production for a range of high-performance nano-enabled products for industries and end consumers. Cellulose nanomaterials can replace products that have higher environmental impact such as those made from fossil fuels. This work provides transparent methods and estimates of the potential annual tonnage production of cellulose nanomaterials for previously identified market applications in the United States. First, potential market applications for cellulose nanomaterials are identified from published data as well as expert input. Those potential uses are categorized as high- or low-volume applications, or as novel applications, which are considered niche markets. For each market the percent adoption of nanocellulose materials is estimated along with the tonnage of cellulose nanomaterials that would be required. Annual U.S. market potential for identified applications of cellulose nanomaterials is estimated to be 6.4 million metric tons (7.1 million short tons), with a global market potential of 35 million metric tons (38.2 million short tons). The greatest volume potential for use of cellulose nanomaterials is currently in paper and packaging applications. Other potentially high-volume uses are in the automotive, construction, personal care, and textile sectors.
Princpal Investigator(s):
 Bilek, Ted


Research Location:
  • Boston, MA
  • Derwood, MD


External Partners:
  • Jo Anne Shatkin, President, Vireo Advisors, Boston, MA
  • John Cowie, President, Cowie & Company, Derwood, MD

Fiscal Year: 2014
Highlight ID: 578
 
Related Research Emphasis Areas: