An Ounce of Prevention

Thanks to Grant Kirker for writing this article spotlighting how homeowner’s can better maintain their wood decks. Kirker is a Research Forest Products Technologist at FPL in the Durability and Wood Protection Research unit.

The experimental test block setup used to examine the role of accumulated leaf litter on material performance and wood durability in aboveground exposure. The test block is surrounded by untreated pine and the channel between the block and frame is filled with leaf litter. The two black fittings on the top are able to take repeated moisture measurement using a pin-type moisture probe. USDA Forest Service Forest Products Laboratory

Benjamin Franklin is credited with the saying “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”, which suggests that taking steps to avert a problem before it starts is far better than taking corrective steps after the problem arises. Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) Wood Durability and Protection researchers, in collaboration with research partners at Oregon State University, attempted to apply this concept to a situation close to home for many homeowners—the wooden deck.

The global wooden decking market in 2020 was valued at $15 billion USD, of which the North American markets made up about 35%, or $5.25 billion USD1. In a 2019 National Association of Homebuilders (NAHB) survey2, 20.3% of all new houses included decks. Although this estimate is lower than historical averages, the global pandemic has led to an increasing interest in outdoor living spaces, which will likely cause this market to increase. Wood is an excellent building material for outdoor decking because of its  reasonable cost and low maintenance requirements; if properly installed and maintained, a wood deck can provide a long-lasting benefit to the homeowner.

Continue reading

Southern Exposure: Long-Term Field Testing of Wood Protectants

When researchers are looking to evaluate the performance of wood protectants, the harsher the environment the better. Which is why Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) researchers put specimens to the test in the Harrison Experimental Forest (HEF) in Saucier, Mississippi, and have been doing so for 80 years.

Generations of FPL researchers have used the HEF field site for sub-tropical field testing. Here Oscar Blew is rating posts at the HEF (1950’s).

Located about 35 miles north of the Gulf of Mexico, this sub-tropical field site receives about 60 inches of rainfall a year and has a mean temperature of 68 degrees Fahrenheit. The wood decay hazard in this area is rated “severe” according to the American Wood Protection Association Use Class Rating System and there is significant subterranean termite activity. When in ground contact, untreated wood rarely lasts 12 months in the HEF, to which researchers respond “challenge accepted.” Continue reading