Supply Chain Sleuths: Partnership Helps Preserve Integrity of Certified Forest Products

Recent action by the Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC) to suspend a major charcoal producer in Europe is one outcome of the FSC and Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) partnership. This collaboration aims at using forensic wood science to investigate supply chainsAlex C. Wiedenhoeft, Research Botanist and Team Leader in FPL’s Center for Wood Anatomy Research (CWAR), has led the CWAR side of a multi-year, award-winning research cooperation between FSC and FPL. Wiedenhoeft and his team conducted the forensic analysis of the contested charcoal.

Specimens of lump charcoal displayed on a specimen submission form.

At issue was whether charcoal appearing on the retail market with the FSC label was in fact sourced from FSC-certified forests.  “Working with investigators within the FSC supply chain integrity team, our forensic results about the botanical origin of the charcoal showed that the species composition of the charcoal was or was not consistent with the species claim,” said Wiedenhoeft.  “As with most forensic applications of botany, the bulk of the work is done by the real-world investigators, whether law enforcement or industrial auditors. Forensic wood science steps in at the evidence analysis phase to give the investigators solid data to inform their investigation.”

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Partnering for Pallet Progress

Before their recent surge in popularity thanks to Pinterest and the DIY craze, wooden pallets were not something most of us ever thought of. But they are prolific in the background of modern life and make so many things we take for granted possible. palletmag

Researchers at the Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) have understood the importance of pallets for decades, and are continuing to support the industry by signing a new memorandum of understanding with the National Wooden Pallet and Container Association (NWPCA).

The agreement allows the two organizations to work together toward mutually beneficial goals, such as developing environmental product declarations for pallets, and using urban wood or trees from forest restoration projects for pallet production.

“It’s a natural partnership with great potential,” says Brent McClendon, NWPCA President and CEO.

FPL Assistant Director Mike Ritter agrees. “With the agreement, we have recognition that there are a number of potential opportunities where FPL and NWPCA can work together,” he said.

The latest issue of Pallet Central, published by NWPCA, further explores the partnership and the opportunities it presents. (You can find the article starting on page 20.)

Biorenewable Bumpers: Scientists Create Stronger, Greener Auto Parts

Scientists at the Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) have teamed up with researchers at Clemson University to give auto parts a wooden upgrade.

The study’s lead expert, Clemson University Assistant Professor Srikanth Pilla, is converting wood to cellulosic nanomaterials, or tiny rod-like structures derived from trees, with help from FPL Materials Research Engineer Craig Clemons and a $481,000 grant from the USDA.

Srikanth Pilla, left, works with a graduate student in their lab. (Photo credit: Clemson University)

Srikanth Pilla, left, works with a graduate student in their lab. (Photo credit: Clemson University)

Researchers are using the cellulosic nanomaterials, measuring at 20,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair, to develop composite material that can be shaped into bumpers and fenders with improved strength.

“They will absorb the energy and just stay intact,” Pilla said. “You won’t have to replace them because there will be no damage at all. Parts made with current materials might resist one impact. These will resist three or four impacts.”

The cellulosic nanomaterials will also ensure the parts are biorenewable, making them suitable for a compost facility once their drive is done.

As the leading wood research facility in the nation, FPL is accustomed to sharing knowledge and resources when wood is in the picture, and this time, the lab has provided Pilla with the essential component to the study.

“We’ll be producing the cellulosic nanomaterials, which are the most fundamental structural elements that you can get out of wood and pulp fibers,” Clemons said. “We’ll also be lending our more than 25 years of experience in creating composites and plastics from wood-derived materials to the project.”

The popularity and demand for biorenewable auto parts could rise in the U.S. if, like in the European Union, the nation develops standards on how much of a vehicle is required to be recyclable and reusable once it has driven its last mile.

Pilla and Clemons’ research is yet another step in creating sustainable forest products for a greener, cleaner future.

To learn more about the project, take a look at the full news release from Clemson.

Blog post by Francesca Yracheta