FPL Scientist Reflects on 20 Years with the Lab

Charles Frihart – or Chuck, as he prefers to be called – has just retired after 20 years with the Forest Products Laboratory. Before that, he worked in industry even longer. The total experience has left him with a unique perspective.

“Before FPL, I spent most of my time in New Jersey,” Chuck reminisced. Even though he lived and worked there for most of his career, Chuck says that he and his family always said we were temporary residents of New Jersey, “because we always considered Wisconsin home.”

Chuck started out working for a pulp and paper company. He then joined Henkel, which is the world’s largest adhesive company.

Chuck says he was happy to have the opportunity to return to Wisconsin in 2001 to work at FPL. His job was to modernize the wood adhesive group through his knowledge of adhesives in non-wood fields.

When paper pulp is manufactured, lignin and other parts of the wood are removed to release cellulose fibers. These byproducts form “black liquor,” which is seven times more abundant than the final paper pulp. This material is concentrated and put through a recovery boiler to recycle the pulping chemicals and provide energy. The pulping by-products are converted into chemicals for adhesives, printing inks, fragrances, and other products.

In industry, Chuck worked on what to do with chemical byproducts from the pulping process.

Charles Frihart at work in the Forest Products Laboratory

“I was mainly working with the fatty acids and what to do with them,” explained Chuck. “Fatty acids are similar to hydrolyzed vegetable oil. Basically, I was working on adhesives for many applications and generated 29 patents.”

Chuck’s interest in bio-based compounds goes back to his college days.

“I’ve always studied these natural products from my work on nucleic acids in college, through industry work on fatty and rosin acids, and at FPL on protein adhesives.

“I was hired at FPL not because I knew a lot about wood adhesives, but because I knew adhesives in general,” Chuck continued. “I was also brought in because FPL wanted someone with a different perspective, which meant being comfortable with working in industry.

“Most of my years with the paper industry, we had a very good executive vice president who wanted people to do a combination of applied and fundamental research. Sometimes you have people who are very good at fundamental research and spend all their time doing it, but have no idea how to make useful products, and the people in industry tend to get so attached to doing the applied work, that they forget fundamental science, so you have to think on both levels, because they’re not mutually exclusive.

“They complement one another and you can make more progress when you combine the two. My goal has always been to make something new, but at the same time understand the fundamentals as well as I can, and not get tied up in either one.

“Trial and error only gets you so far, so my thing has been to really understand how wood adhesives work and why they fail. Wood adhesives don’t normally fail except under wet conditions, and in some cases, with some of the adhesives applications, you also need temperature resistance, as in a fire, and that was a problem.”

The adhesives group needed a team of  specialists in material science, analytical chemistry, mechanics and wood chemistry. The first addition involved Chuck’s welcoming Daniel Yelle, who does adhesive chemical reactions with wood polymers and lignin chemistry. “We have studied lignin, but few people have figured out how to get useful adhesive products out of lignin,” explained Chuck. “Although there have been about 200-some papers that have claimed that success, it’s actually only used marginally on a commercial level.

 “The other area for bio-based adhesives is proteins, and soy beans specifically,” said Chuck. “Besides oil and protein food products, it’s basically used as animal food. We don’t produce much tofu or other kinds of fermented soy-based products for people as they do in China and other parts of East Asia. Also, soybeans have a high percentage of lysine, which is an amino acid and an important nutrient for animals.”

Chuck said that it is very difficult to understand proteins in adhesive applications because proteins can change properties very easily, and it’s hard to measure when the properties of proteins change. Chuck pointed out that soy is the major product that has been used in interior wood adhesives in the United States for over 10 years.

Among the major accomplishments in wood adhesives at FPL, Chuck points to the work of Joseph Jakes and Nayomi Plaza Rodriguez, “because they have developed an understanding of the fundamental structure of wood cell walls.”

Joseph works with Argonne National Laboratory, and Nayomi works with Oakridge National Laboratory, both run by the Department of Energy. Chuck said that the major advantage to these collaborations is that the other labs have extremely expensive experimental equipment and allow FPL scientists to write proposals and have access to it. “What makes us different is that we combine chemical probes made by Linda Lorenz with the analysis of wood cell walls to understand how adhesives react with wood itself,” said Chuck.

“The real challenge with adhesives is that they typically only work well only under dry conditions. It’s when things get wet that many of the adhesives fall apart and you have joints coming apart on wood products, et cetera. And so you have to understand the wood swelling and shrinking properties and how it’s doing that, and what Joseph and Nayomi and the others have done is just fantastic. So I can’t claim credit; I had the concept, but I didn’t know how to do it, so my role was more of an instigator, rather than the person who figured out how to do it. And it made FPL the leader in understanding wood cell walls and the behavior of wood.

“FPL is fortunate to have a core of very bright young scientists who can carry us through for the next few decades and who are doing things that nobody else is doing.

“At a certain point,” Chuck said wistfully, “your science becomes dated, and you need to be replaced by people who have different knowledge and abilities of how to carry out science. I’ve enjoyed the science and the people at FPL. Being involved in science is in my blood and will continue, just on a lower priority.”


Chemist Celebrates 55 Years with FPL

Assuming you were already born, what were you doing in 1966?

Designer Mary Quant introduced the mini skirt, Simon & Garfunkel reached #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 with their iconic hit, “The Sound of Silence,” and both the Star Trek and Batman series debuted on TV.

And if your name was Linda Lorenz, you were fresh out of college, starting your first day as a chemist at the Forest Products Laboratory.

Linda is still here, conducting her experiments and celebrating her 55th anniversary at FPL.

Chemist Linda Lorenz and colleagues at a length-of-service ceremony in 1996, when she celebrated 30 years with the Forest Products Laboratory.

Throwback Thursday: The FPL Rotting Pit

Thanks to Grant Kirker for writing this fascinating look back into Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) history and science. Kirker is a Research Forest Products Technologist at FPL in the Durability and Wood Protection Research unit.

Throughout its 110-year history, FPL has participated in groundbreaking wood research both nationally and internationally. The FPL research libraries contain a virtual treasure trove of information pertaining to the wise use of wood and wood-based materials. Historical overviews like this would not be possible without them.

One of the earliest endeavors at the newly established Forest Products Laboratory, then located at 1509 University Avenue in Madison, Wisconsin, was the testing of preservative treated wood for the expanding railroad sector in the US. The swift growth of railways across the country had created a huge demand for suitable hardwoods. But high decline rates due to wood rot fungi was a constant concern leading to an unreasonable amount of wood being used to replace rapidly rotting railroad ties. The dawn of wood preservation research at FPL was aimed at increasing the service life of rail ties to reduce the demand on America’s forests.  

Original Forest Products Laboratory Building at 1509 University Avenue
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110 Years of FPL: Strength Testing

In celebration of 110 years of research at the Forest Products Laboratory (FPL), we are revisiting blog posts that detail some of our most interesting historic people, places, and projects. Enjoy!

A 1950’s test of a large wood cylindrical structure in the 1,000,000-pound capacity testing machine. This machine was also used to evaluate poles, piles and large wood beams.

Forest Product Laboratory (FPL) researchers established selection and testing procedures for determining strength properties of wood, which were adopted as standards by ASTM International (formerly the American Society for Testing and Materials, ASTM). These standards have, in recent years, had an important bearing on the development of comprehensive international standards sponsored by the Committee on Mechanical Wood Technology of the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations.

Strength testing research conducted by FPL employees included the following categories:

Toughness Testing
FPL developed a machine to test the ability of wood to absorb shock or impact loads. The toughness test procedure and machine have become standard both nationally and internationally.

Strength Factors
The staff determined the effect that knots, preservative treatment, decay, moisture content, and other factors have on wood strength. This work has resulted in increased safety, marked improvement in efficiency, and increased satisfaction in wood use.

Low Temperatures
FPL carried out research at temperatures as low as -300°F, which showed that—far from becoming weak and brittle at low temperatures—wood actually gets stronger. This data established wood’s advantages for construction in frigid areas and have helped established new uses for wood, such as structural insulation in commercial barges that provide low-cost, world-wide transportation for liquid methane.

Decayed Wood
FPL evaluated the properties of Douglas-fir lumber cut from timber infected with a fungus called white pocket, to show how it could be used effectively. As a result, Douglas-fir sheathing and dimension grades are permitted to contain certain amounts of white pocket. Over-mature timber previously left in the woods can now be harvested and used more effectively.

Long-Term Loading Effects
Most strength testing of wood reveals the reaction of wood to the application of loads over a very short time. Most wood used in structures however is expected to carry load for long periods of times. The FPL has therefore carried out long-term loading experiments to develop data to support engineers and design professionals.

FPL Celebrates 110 Years of Innovation

Today, June 4, 2020, marks 110 years since the doors opened at the Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) and a world of possibility opened with them.

We could never summarize in one blog post all the incredible advances in the world of wood that have occurred since then. In fact, FPL has produced more than 20,000 publications over the years, all of which are available to anyone who finds them useful, be they fellow researchers, industry partners, or homeowners with a project to tackle. (Many are digitized here.)

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