FPL Researcher Honored with Multiple Awards

Laura Hasburgh, a fire protection engineer in FPL’s Building and Fire Sciences unit has recently been awarded two accolades for her work.

Laura Hasburgh, FPL fire protection engineer

The University of Wisconsin – Madison’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MS&E) presented Laura with the 2019 Turnbull Service Award. This award is meant to honor an exemplary MS&E graduate student who has made notable contributions to public service. Committee members deemed Laura an ideal recipient of this award based on her significant contributions to the public in the area of fire safety and outstanding service.

Laura has also been named the recipient of the Society of Fire Protection Engineers‘ (SFPE) Margaret Law Award for pioneering advancements associated with engineering fire safety of the built environment. This award will be presented at the SFPE Annual Conference and Expo in October.

‘ (SFPE) Margaret Law Award for pioneering advancements associated with engineering fire safety of the built environment. This award will be presented at the SFPE Annual Conference and Expo in October.

Congratulations, Laura, on these well-deserved honors!

Hot New Video! Full-Scale CLT Fire Testing Yields Impressive Results

Trust us, you’re going to want to see this.

Forest Products Laboratory researchers conducted fire testing on a two-story cross-laminated timber (CLT) structure. Watch the short video below to see these one-bedroom apartments go up in flames, and to find out how CLT performed in the heat of the moment.

You can read more specifics about the tests in this previous LabNotes blog post, or if you’re really into the details and data, check out the full FPL general technical report.

Turning Up the Heat: Fires Test Performance of Tall Wood Buildings

Wood buildings provide an array of economic and environmental benefits. Interest in capitalizing on those benefits by constructing mid- to high-rise buildings using cross-laminated timber (CLT) is growing. CLT is made from layers of dried lumber boards stacked in alternating direction at 90-degree angles, glued and pressed to form solid panels. These panels have exceptional strength and stability and can be used as walls, roofs, and floors. Additionally, calculations have shown that a seven-inch floor made of CLT has a fire resistance of two hours.

In order for wood structures to rise above six stories without special building official permission, changes to the International Building Code are needed. It’s a tall order, but researchers from the Forest Service’s Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) recently completed a series of fire tests that will address concerns about fire performance of wood buildings and help take them to new heights. Continue reading

High-Rise Wood Buildings: Interactive Map Shows Construction Around the World

It’s safe to say we have a thing for tall wood buildings here at the Forest Products Laboratory.

Dalston Lane is a 121-home development set to open in London this summer.

Dalston Lane is a 121-home development set to open in London this summer.

Case in point: We study what happens to their moisture content during construction, look at how they perform in earthquakes, test fire retardant treatments for their components, host workshops about them and post the presentations for all the world to see, and even sponsor large events, like the Mass Timber Conference happening in Portland, Oregon, this week!

With all that in mind, you can imagine our excitement when curbed.com published an interactive map (swoon!) of all the wooden high-rises in the world, some completed, others under construction or in concept. Scroll through the list or click a number on the map to read about the buildings’ features, see photos and drawings, and find out more via website links.

Even if you’re not quite as obsessed with wood as we are, we guarantee you won’t be disappointed with this cyber-trip around the world to see some truly stunning architecture.

New Technology, Old Problems: Heat Release Research an FPL Mainstay

The following post is adapted from the book Forest Products Laboratory 1910-2010, Celebrating A Century of Accomplishments.

As an early promoter of the use of heat release rate as a measure of relative flammability, John Brenden developed the original Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) apparatus to measure the heat released by a burning material in the 1960s. Heat release research was reliable and effective, and FPL continued to obtain new equipment as better technologies were developed to measure heat release rates.

The cone calorimeter replaced the apparatus from Ohio State University that was employed by FPL researchers in the 1980s.

In the 1980s, the original apparatus was replaced by one from Ohio State University, and 10 years later, was replaced by a cone calorimeter developed by the National Bureau of Standards. Today this organization is known as the National Institute for Standards and Technology. The cone calorimeter is used in investigations into fire-retardant treatments (FRT) for composite materials and fundamental research on the fire behavior of wood.

A cone calorimeter is a laboratory instrument that gathers data ranging from ignition time, to combustion products and, of course, heat release rate. It is used with small samples of flammable material. Its name reflects the conical shape of the radiant heater used in the device.

In addition to their use in evaluating the effectiveness of fire-retardant treatments, test methods for the rate of heat release were critical in the development of models to predict flame spread behavior of wood and times for flashover in the standard room-corner test.

Heat release graphs are still used by FPL researchers to determine the effectiveness of flame-retardant wood treatments.

Today, FPL researchers still use heat release rates to determine a material’s flammability. FPL Research General Engineer Mark Dietenberger, and Laura Hasburgh, a Fire Protection Engineer at FPL, feature an FRT heat release rate graph in their recently published document, Wood Products Thermal Degradation and Fire in the Materials Science and Materials Engineering Reference Module for Elsevier. More information can be viewed here.