New Videos of Blast Tests Available

New video footage has been released of blast testing performed on cross laminated timber (CLT) structures, and it’s quite a sight to see.

The Forest Products Laboratory, in cooperation with WoodWorks and the Softwood Lumber Board, led a second round of live blast testing in 2017 at Tyndall Air Force Base in Panama City, Florida.

The charges in the videos were large enough to potentially cause lethal injury, and the structures survived. The objective of these studies was to demonstrate the capability of CLT structures to resist airblast loads, thereby allowing the military to incorporate mass timber materials like CLT into their construction projects.

You can read more about the study here, and see all the blast test videos on the WoodWorks YouTube channel.

Blast Testing, Take Two! An Update on CLT Blast Test Research

The following is an update to a previous LabNotes post.  The updated version was recently featured on the USDA and Forest Service blogs:

All three structures remained standing after the testing – even tests designed to take the structures well beyond their design intent. (Photo courtesy of Air Force Civil Engineering Center AFCEC, Tyndall Air Force Base)

At the USDA Forest Service’s Forest Products Laboratory (FPL), researchers sometimes get a little destructive. They bend and break wood samples of all sizes, and even shoot lumber out of a cannon at 100 miles per hour.

But explosions? That’s a bit out of their wheelhouse. Not that wood can’t handle it. Particularly when it’s used in engineered products like cross-laminated timber, or CLT, which FPL researchers have studied from many angles, including fire performance, use in earthquake-prone regions, and the effects of moisture on CLT. Made of alternating layers of dried lumber boards stacked at 90-degree angles, CLT is exceptionally strong and stable and can be used as walls, roofs, and floors in mid-rise buildings. Continue reading