Investigating CLT’s Ability to Fight Fungus

The growing reputation of cross-laminated timber (CLT) as a sustainable, cost-effective, and innovative building material has prompted researchers at the Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) to build upon past research and investigate the material’s ability to fight against fungus.

Intact cross-laminated timber panel section (left); 4-in. cube cut from panel section for scaled-up decay testing.

(A) Intact cross-laminated timber panel section; (B) 4-in. cube cut from panel section for scaled-up decay testing.

Praised for its many benefits, including speed of construction, cost, sustainability, excellent thermal and sound insulation, and fire restriction qualities, the pre-fabricated building material has made a name for itself in the construction and worldwide mass timber market. CLT has already made an appearance in a variety of high-rise apartment buildings in the Pacific Northwest and Southeast United States, urging scientists in the Lab’s Durability and Wood Protection Unit to further examine how the timber fairs against a rainy, humid climate.

The study builds upon past conclusions that untreated CLT is susceptible to mold and a variety of fungi. While decay can be reduced with preservatives such as boron, researchers are using more methods to investigate resistance treatments.

Scientists have implemented soil block assay tests on numerous random samples of CLT, and also plan to conduct mass loss and x-ray density profiling to assess decay in CLT.It is hoped that this exploration will help researchers develop more targeted fungal reduction methods for CLT.

The project will conclude in early 2017.  For more information on CLT and fungal resistance, read the full Research in Progress report.

Blog post by Francesca Yracheta