Will Skyscrapers of Tomorrow be “Plyscrapers”?

If anyone is going to be enthusiastic about building with wood, its researchers from the Forest Products Laboratory (FPL).

Albina Yard, a 16,000-square-foot office building in Portland, uses wood, not steel and concrete, as its structural support. (Courtesy LEVER Architecture)

Albina Yard, a 16,000-square-foot office building in Portland, uses wood, not steel and concrete, as its structural support. (Courtesy LEVER Architecture)

FPL engineers Dave Kretschmann and Doug Rammer recently shared that enthusiasm with the folks from Smithsonian.com and imparted their wisdom about the virtues of building tall with wood. The result is a comprehensive article on cross-laminated timber (CLT) and the opportunities it affords architects, engineers, and users alike.

According to Kretsmann, CLT has “energized the wood product community and a lot of people want to see it succeed.” He and Rammer go on to discuss their roles, including the development of building codes and standards, and studies on the material’s performance in fires and earthquakes.

You’ll see a quick search of this blog will produce no shortage of posts on cross-laminated timber. We’re happy to see the word on wood spreading farther all the time.