Looking for Better Wood DNA Extraction Techniques

Researchers at the Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) recently began a study focused on developing innovative techniques to extract quality DNA samples from wood and wood products.

According to an FPL Research In Progress report titled Anatomically Informed Optimization of Wood and Wood Products for Forensic Analysis, compared to other plant parts, wood is often a poor source of DNA, even if it is extracted from a living tree.  The processing of trees and wood can further diminish the quality and usability of that DNA.

A hickory specimen showing the heartwood–sapwood transi - tion and inner and outer bark. DNA content is highest in the  inner bark and lowest in the outer bark and heartwood. Inset: a  fluorescence micrograph of freezer-milled Alaska yellow-cedar  showing intact nuclei (blue-white dots). With organellar mi - crocapture, we will be able to selectively extract the nuclei for  analysis.

A hickory specimen showing the heartwood–sapwood transition and inner and outer bark. DNA content is highest in the inner bark and lowest in the outer bark and heartwood. Inset: a fluorescence micrograph of freezer-milled Alaska yellow-cedar showing intact nuclei (blue-white dots). With organellar microcapture, we will be able to selectively extract the nuclei for
analysis.

Scientists hope exploring and developing improved DNA extraction practices will open the door to valuable, cost effective, and revolutionary research, especially in the field of forensic botany and timber forensics.

FPL researchers plan to examine various tree species in order to develop preprocessing methods for wood DNA extraction. Furthermore, botanists plan to explore the use of DNA databases and predict extraction protocols for new woods based on wood structure.

The project will conclude in 2018.

To learn more about this study, read the full Research In Progress report.

Blog post by Francesca Yracheta