FPL Researcher Featured on Seeker Wild Crime

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Forest Product’s Laboratory’s (FPL) research botanist Alex Wiedenhoeft  is being featured in a “Seeker Wild Crime” episode for his collaborative research on wood forensics and his groundbreaking technological innovation that is combatting global illegal logging.

Alex C. Wiedenhoeft, Ph.D.
Wood Anatomy and Forest Mycology in a

Changing Global Environment
Research Botanist and Team Leader

Seeker is an American digital media network and publisher that produces online science-based content reaching millions each month. The Seeker Media’s mission statement is to “empower the curious to understand the science that is shaping our world.”

Find out how Wiedenhoeft and Assistant Scientist from the University of Wisconsin, Prabu Ravindran, are positively shaping the world by watching the SeekerMedia Wild Crime episode called, “How Illegal Logging is Funding Organized Crime.” See it at https://www.facebook.com/107124643386/videos/682354979370935

Want to learn more about the amazing advancements our scientists are making? Visit the Forest Products Laboratory at https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/

FPL’s XyloTron Helps Timber Industry in Ghana

The XyloTron, a Forest Products Laboratory (FPL)-developed, field-deployable digital imaging device for wood, is having a positive impact on timber industries worldwide.

In 2018, a Ghanaian wood identification expert and three inspectors from the country’s Timber Industry Development Division, spent time at FPL learning how to use the Xylotron so they could train others to use the equipment when they returned home.

This recently released video tells the story of how the device is now being used in Ghana, where more than two million people earn their living in the wood and timber industry.

Murder Mystery: When the Witness is a Tree

Could this wounded tree provide clues to what happened to Bonnie Woodward?

In late June of 2010 Bonnie Woodward went missing. An acquaintance, Roger Carroll, was an early suspect for her assumed murder but police found no evidence of any crime, and never found her body.  For nearly eight years she remained missing and the case went cold.  It was only after Roger Carroll admitted to his wife that he had killed Woodward that critical new information came to light.

 A witness claimed Carroll shot Woodward at his rural Jersey County, Illinois, home, burned her remains in a huge brush pile that he stoked for several days, then used a tractor to push all the evidence – or so he thought – into a creek. Carroll was taken into custody in April of 2018 and charged with first-degree murder.

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World Wildlife Fund Asks “Can Forensics Save Forests?”

Researchers at the Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) have partnered with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) to investigate whether wood from products sold in the United States is accurately labeled. The forensic expertise of FPL botanist Alex Wiedenhoeft was key in this research, and the findings of the study were recently published in a journal article in PLOS One.

For an easily-accessible explanation of the research, check out this story from WWF. It’s full of great photos that give you a behind-the-scenes look into Alex’s forensic work and the world’s largest research wood collection, housed here at FPL in the Center for Wood Anatomy Research.

FPL botanist Alex Wiedenhoeft and his team in the Center for Wood Anatomy Research.
Photo credit: Jim Schnepf, WWF-US

Assessing Wood from Hurricane-Downed Trees in Puerto Rico

After Hurricane Maria made landfall in September 2017, the storm left hundreds of thousands of downed trees in its wake. Many of the trees were species with commercially valuable wood, but which ones?

A huge pile of logs from hurricane-downed trees in Puerto Rico.
Wood from hurricane-downed trees in Puerto Rico. Species identification was needed to decide how to best use or dispose of the material.

To find out, an assessment of the post-hurricane wood, stored at 21 different locations around the island, was requested by Puerto Rico’s Department of Natural and Environmental Resources, or DNER. The Federal Emergency Management Agency supported this request through the Natural and Cultural Resources Recovery Support Function.  The Department of the Interior contacted the USDA Forest Service, and scientists Mike Wiemann of the Forest Products Laboratory and William Gould from the International Institute of Tropical Forestry developed an assessment of the species mix and log quality of the downed trees.

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