Labeling Wood Products for a Greener World

Seven updated Environmental product declarations (EPDs) for wood products were recently released by the American Wood Council (AWC).  Maintaining up-to-date industry-wide, cradle-to-gate EPDs is a joint venture among several organizations including the AWC, the Canadian Wood Council (CWC), Consortium for Research on Renewable Industrial Materials (CORRIM), The Engineered Wood Association (APA), Composite Panel Association (CPA), and Forest Products Laboratory (FPL).

The updated EPDs cover a diverse selection of wood products: lumber, plywood, oriented strand board, laminated veneer lumber, I-joists, glue-laminated timber, and redwood lumber.

EPDs aren’t just arbitrary labels slapped onto wood products—they offer a transparent and straight-forward way to understand the potential and overall environmental impact of a wood product, starting from its harvesting and ending at its usage, its cradle-to-gate profile. Industry-wide EPDs also include a permanent carbon sequestration calculation that can be balanced against the amount of carbon emitted during manufacture.  

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Why Using Forest Products is Good for Forests

Toilet Paper By Dusk – stock.adobe.com

Forest Products Laboratory researcher John Considine lends his expertise to help Rayonier Incorporated explain why what they do is so essential. Learn why trees are an irreplaceable ingredient in so many household products, even in the soft paper roll right next to your loo. Paper products are essential to modern life and trees are the sustainable resource that makes it all possible. Check out the story at https://www.rayonier.com/stories/using-paper-toilet-paper-and-cardboard-is-good-for-forests/

$10 Million Grant Awarded for Biomass Consortium

The National Institute for Food and Agriculture recently announced the recipients of $90 million in funding through the agency’s Agriculture and Food Research Initiative’s Sustainable Agriculture Systems program.

The Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) is a main collaborator in a project lead by West Virginia University’s Jingxin Wang. The project, “Mid-Atlantic Sustainable Biomass for Value-added Products Consortium (MASBio)” was awarded $10 million over five years to deliver a sustainable and economically feasible biomass for value-added products system in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States.

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A Salty Tale of Wood Damage Research and Discovery

A tenacious fungus, a conspiracy theory, a historic ship, a unique gift from Princeton University, and two Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) researchers, Grant Kirker and Samuel Zelinka, collaborating with researchers from Germany and Canada all converged in the right order of events to produce some of the most significant advances in wood salt damage understanding in over twenty years.

Samuel Zelinka – Supervisory Materials Research Engineer
Grant Kirker – Research Forest Products Technologist

A recent publication, “Salt Damage in Wood: Controlled Laboratory Exposures and Mechanical Property Measurements,” is the result of all of these circumstances and characters clashing and aligning.

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Research on Electronic Components Made from Wood Continues to Advance

The Forest Products Laboratory and the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW) have a history of collaboration aimed at making electronic components from wood. From flexible electronic screens to computer chips, this partnership has produced fascinating results. Learn more about the latest development in the following article from the UW.

Critical communications component made on a flexible wooden film

By Jason Daley

In the not-too-distant future, flexible electronics will open the door to new products like foldable phones, tablets that can be rolled, paper-thin displays and wearable sensors that monitor health data. Developing these new bendy products, however, means using materials like new plastics and thin films to replace the rigid circuit boards and bulky electronic components that currently occupy the interiors of cell phones and other gadgets.

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