Oxydendrum arboreum

 

this page uses English units of measure

click here to view the file in metric units

 

Family: Ericaceae

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

click to print or download the file in .pdf format

 

Sourwood

 

 

 

The genus Oxydendrum contains only one species native to North America. The word oxydendrum comes from the Greek, meaning sour and tree, from the acid taste of the leaves.

Oxydendrum arboreum- Arrowwood, Elk Tree, Lily of the Valley Tree, Sorrel Gum, Sorrel Tree, Sour Gum, Titi, Titi Tree

Distribution

From Pennsylvania to Ohio and Indiana, south to Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi and Louisiana, east to Florida, Georgia, Virginia and Maryland

The Tree

Sourwood is a medium size tree which grows at altitudes up to 3500 feet in well drained gravely soils. It grows scattered among Oaks, sweetgum, hickories and pines. It produces white flowers which are bell shaped like Lily of the Valley flowers and capsule shaped fruits. Sourwood attains a height of 60 feet and a diameter of 2 feet.

The Wood

General

The sapwood of Sourwood is wide and yellowish brown to light pink brown, while the heartwood is brown tinged with red, dulling with age. It has no characteristic odor or taste and is heavy and hard. It is diffuse porous.

Mechanical Properties (2-inch standard)

 

 

 

 

Compression

 

 

 

 

Specific

gravity

MOE

x106 lbf/in2

MOR

lbf/in2

Parallel

lbf/in2

Perpendicular

lbf/in2

WMLa

in-lbf/in3

Hardness

lbf

Shear

lbf/in2

Green

0.50

1.32

7,700

3,250

680

9.8

730

1,160

Dry

0.55

1.54

11,600

6,190

1,080

10.9

940

1,500

aWML = Work to maximum load.

Reference (59).

 

Drying and Shrinkage

Type of shrinkage

Percentage of shrinkage
(green to final moisture content)

0% MC

6% MC

20% MC

Tangential

8.9

Radial

6.3

Volumetric

15.2

Sourwood is difficult to season.

Reference (59)

Kiln Drying Schedules

No information available at this time.

Working Properties: Sourwood is difficult to work.

Durability: No information available at this time.

Preservation: No information available at this time.

Uses: Paneling, bearings of machinery, sled runners, fuel wood and tool handles.

Toxicity: No information available at this time.

Additional Reading and References Cited (in parentheses)

29. Elias, T.S. 1980. The complete trees of North America, field guide and natural history. ?Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., New York, 948 pp.

55. Little, Jr., E.L.1979. Checklist of United States trees (native and naturalized). USDA ?Forest Service, Ag. Handbook No. 541, USGPO, Washington, DC.

59. Markwardt, L.J. and T.R.C. Wilson. 1935. Strength and related properties of woods ?grown in the United States. USDA Forest Service, Tech. Bull. No. 479. USGPO, ?Washington, DC.

68. Panshin, A.J. and C. de Zeeuw. 1980. Textbook of Wood Technology, 4th Ed., ?McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, 722 pp.

74. Record, S.J. and R.W. Hess. 1943. Timbers of the new world. Yale University Press, ?New Haven, 640 pp.

90. Summitt, R. and A. Sliker. 1980. CRC handbook of materials science. Volume 4, ?wood. ?CRC Press, Inc., Boca Raton, FL. 459 pp.