Amelanchier spp.

 

 

this page uses English units of measure

click here for the page in metric units of measure

 

Family: Rosaceae

 

 

 

 

 

 

click to print or download the file in .pdf format

 

Serviceberry

 

 

 

 

The genus Amelanchier contains about 16 species native to North America [5], Mexico [2], and Eurasia to northern Africa [4]. The word amelanchier is derived from the French common name amelanche of the European serviceberry, Amelanchier ovalis.

Distribution

In North America throughout upper elevations and temperate forests.

The Tree

Serviceberry is a shrub or tree that reaches a height of 40 ft (12 m) and a diameter of 2 ft (0.6 m). It grows in many soil types and occurs from swamps to mountainous hillsides. It flowers in early spring, producing delicate white flowers, making it a good ornamental shrub. It produces smooth to scaly bark, and red to purple pear-shaped fruits.

The Wood

The wood of serviceberry is brown and is as hard and heavy as persimmon, but of smaller size. It is close grained and takes a satiny finish. The heartwood is reddish brown, marked with red streaks, and has a lighter colored sapwood.

General

text

Mechanical Properties (2-inch standard)

 

 

 

 

Compression

 

 

 

 

Specific

gravity

MOE

106 lbf/in2

MOR

103 lbf/in2

Parallel

103 lbf/in2

Perpendicular

103 lbf/in2

WMLa

in-lbf/in3

Hardness

lbf

Shear

103 lbf/in2

Green

0.66

1.64

9.60

4.08

0.78

16.2

1,240

1.26

Dry

0.79

1.88

16.9

8.77

1.79

18.9

1,800

159

 

Drying and Shrinkage

Type of shrinkage

Percentage of shrinkage
(green to final moisture content)

0% MC

6% MC

20% MC

Tangential

10.8

NA

NA

Radial

6.7

NA

NA

Volumetric

18.7

NA

NA

aBirch shrinks considerably during drying. References: 0% MC (98),
6% and 20% MC (90).

Kiln Drying Schedulesa

No information available at this time.

Working Properties:

No information available at this time.

Durability:

No information available at this time.

Preservation:

No information available at this time.

Uses:

Tool handles, fishing rods.

Toxicity:

No information available at this time.

Additional Reading and References Cited 29, 55, 68, 74.

29, 55, 68, 74.
29. Elias, T.S. 1980. The complete trees of North America, field guide and natural history. New York: van Nostrand Reinhold Company.
55. Little, Jr., E.L. 1979. Checklist of United States trees (native and naturalized). Agric. Handb. 541. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. U.S. Government Printing Office.
59. Markwardt, L.J.; Wilson, T.R.C. 1935. Strength and related properties of woods grown in the United States. Tech. Bull. 479. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. U.S. Government Printing Office.
68. Panshin, A.J.; de Zeeuw, C. 1980. Textbook of wood technology, 4th ed. New York: McGraw—Hill Book Co..
74. Record, S.J.; Hess R.W. 1943. Timbers of the new world. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.