Staudtia stipitata syn. S. gabonensis
Family: Myristicaceae
Niove
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Other Common Names: M'bonda (Cameroon), Niove, M'boun (Gabon), Kamashi, Nkafi (Zaire).

 

Distribution: Found in Gabon, Cameroon, and the Congo region; occurs in mixed forests, in large stands, as well as secondary forests.

 

The Tree: Reaches a height of 70 to 100 ft; bole is cylindrical, straight and clear to 60 ft; butt is sometimes swollen; trunk diameter to 3 ft.

 

The Wood:

General Characteristics: Heartwood red brown to yellow brown with darker streaks; sapwood 4 in. wide, pale yellow to orange brown. Texture is very fine; grain straight; slightly lustrous and occasionally oily; pepperlike scent.

 

Weight: Basic specific gravity (ovendry weight/green volume) 0.75; air-dry density 57 pcf.

 

Mechanical Properties: (2-cm standard)

 

Moisture content   Bending strength   Modulus of elasticity   Maximum crushing strength

            (%)                  (Psi)                            (1,000 psi)                   (Psi)

12% (44)                     23,500                         NA                              11,300

 

12% (46)                     25,400                         2,300                           13,300

 

Amsler toughness 155 to 272 in.-lb at 12% moisture content (2-cm specimen).

 

Drying and Shrinkage: Seasons slowly and requires care to avoid end checking, little warp. No information on kiln schedules. Shrinkage green to ovendry: radial 5.5%; tangential 7.2%; volumetric 12.5%. Movement in service is small.

 

Working Properties: Timber saws slowly but with little difficulty, tungsten-carbide tipped cutters are suggested; planes with ease to produce a smooth finish, glues satisfactorily. Should be quartersawn. if steamed, suitable for slicing.

 

Durability: Excellent durability and resistant to termite attack. Excellent weathering properties.

 

Preservation: Difficult to treat.

 

Uses: Cabinetwork, joinery, decorative veneers, flooring, turnery.

 

Additional Reading: (3), (36), (44), (46)

 

3. Bolza, E., and W. G. Keating.  1972.  African timbers-the properties, uses, and              characteristics of 700   species.  CSIRO.  Div.  of Build.  Res., Melbourne,             Australia.

36.France: Revue Bois Appl.  1957.  Niove (Staudtia gabonensis).  Revue Bois Appl.              12(9/10):32.

44.Sallenave, P. 1955.  Proprietes et mecaniques des bois tropicaux de l'union  Francaise.              Pub.  Centre Tech.  For.  Trop.  No.  8.

46.Sallenave, P. 1964.  Proprietes physiques et mecaniques des bois tropicaux.  Premier             Supplement.  Centre Tech.  For.  Trop.  No.  23.

 

From: Chudnoff, Martin. 1984. Tropical Timbers of the World. USDA Forest Service. Ag. Handbook No. 607.