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Title: Wood Handbook, Chapter 15: Wood Preservation

Source: General Technical Report FPL-GTR-190. Madison, WI: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory: 15-1 - 15-28. Chapter 15.

Author(s)Lebow, Stan T.

Publication Year: 2010  View PDF »

Related Publications: view

Publication Series: General Technical Reports
Associated Research Project(s):   FPL-4723-3

Abstract: Many commonly used wood species can deteriorate if exposed to conditions that support growth of wood-degrading organisms (see Chap. 14). Wood products can be protected from the attack of decay fungi, harmful insects, or marine borers by applying chemical preservatives. Preservative treatments greatly increase the life of wood structures, thus reducing replacement costs and allowing more efficient use of forest resources. The degree of protection achieved depends on the preservative used and the proper penetration and retention of the chemicals. Some preservatives are more effective than others, and some are more adaptable to certain use requirements. To obtain long-term effectiveness, adequate penetration and retention are needed for each wood species, chemical preservative, and treatment method. Not only are different methods of treating wood available, but treatability varies among wood species-particularly their heartwood, which generally resists preservative treatment more than does sapwood. Although some tree species possess naturally occurring resistance to decay and insects (see Chap. 14), many are in short supply or are not grown in ready proximity to markets.

Keywords: Wood preservatives, wood preservation, preserved wood, standards, performance standards, treated wood, preservatives, preservative treated wood, preservation, penetration, preservative treatments, water-repellent preservatives, application methods, species differences, durability, treatment

Publication Review Process: Formally Refereed

Date posted: 06/21/2010

This publication is also viewable on Treesearch:  view
RITS Product ID: 35890
Current FPL Scientist associated with this publication
Lebow, Stan T.
Research Forest Products Technologist
  

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